My Life in Cars (Sponsored by Michelin) 

Last month, Michelin and our good friends at Life of Dad partnered to talk about not only our #FirstCarMoments, but also our dedication to safety. One of the things they encouraged us to talk about was our experiences with cars in the past, and things we hope for the future. 

As I look back on my life now I realized the scope of cars I’ve driven, ridden in and worked on. I’m not really a mechanic, but with my experience I’m betting I could pass whatever test their is to become certified. This is because of, not only that all the cars I’ve had needed work, but my Dad set out to teach me. He’s no mechanic either, but he knows his stuff and he knows that putting in the effort and doing it yourself can be rewarding in many ways. 

I’ve swapped out engines, helped rebuild one or two, replaced exhaust systems, spark plugs, brakes, body parts, interior etc. I’ve done just about everything except for rebuilding a transmission, because thats just rediculously complicated nor have I even had the tools to accomplish it. 90% of this was under the teutalage of my Dad, and it’s one of the many things he was able to pass down to me. 

If you ask me what I did for my birthday in 2010, I certainly don’t remember a thing about it. I can tell you however that 2010 was the year I had a 1999 Kia Sephia, of which by the time I was done with it, had a new water pump, exhaust manifold, wiring for the electric windows and rear bumper. I can tell you that my first car (a 1972 Volkswagon Superbeatle) had shotty wiring, hoses that were too big for the engine and stuck a little bit in 2nd gear. That was back in 2004, and I couldn’t even tell you the name of my girlfriend at that point. 

I have a mind for Cars, it’s just always been that way. I was excited to learn and had an excellent teacher. But although learning all these things (how to use the tools and fix the parts) have saved me thousands of dollars worth of mechanic labor costs and whatnot, it taught me something far more valuable: Safety. 

Being responsible for my own car taught me to constantly pay attention to the details, because ignoring even the slightest thing could end up costing you your life or the life of a loved one riding in the car with you. Getting your first car is an unforgettable milestone in any person’s life. It bestows freedom and independence, but with that comes a great responsibility to stay safe on the road.

Michelin, Life of Dad and Dad on The Mic would like to extend to you a peice of this knowledge that is simple and can help you stay safe on the road. Our goal is to remind drivers that whether or not your first (or current!) car is in the best condition, your tires should be. Ultimately, it doesn’t matter what kind of car you (or your teen) drive. What matters most is that your tires are safe.

Summer is a critical time to remind drivers of the importance of tire safety. The period between Memorial Day and Labor Day is often referred to as the 100 deadliest days for teen drivers, based on accident data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and National Safety Council. The good news is that accidents due to improper tire maintenance are preventable, and simple steps can save lives.

Take the time to learn more about your car, what tires you have and how to take care of them. As we like to say here at DOTM, a quote from G.I. Joe: 

“Now you know, and knowing is half the battle!”

Stay safe out there.

-B.K. Mullen

@dadonthemic
Disclosure: I have partnered with Life of Dad and Michelin for this promotion. I have received compensation for my participation, but my first car memories are my own.

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